History

Mention of spearmint dates back to at least the 1st century AD, with references from naturalist Pliny and mentions in the Bible. Further records show descriptions of mint in ancient mythology. Findings of early versions of toothpaste using mint in the 14th century suggest widespread domestication by this point. It was introduced into England through the Romans by the 5th century, and the "Father of British Botany", of the surname Turner, mentions mint as being good for the stomach.

John Gerard's Herbal (1597) states that: "It is good against watering eyes and all manner of break outs on the head and sores. It is applied with salt to the biting of mad dogs," and that "They lay it on the stinging of wasps and bees with good success." He also mentions that "the smell rejoice the heart of man", for which cause they used to strew it in chambers and places of recreation, pleasure and repose, where feasts and banquets are made." Source

Spearmint

(Mentha spicata)

Spearmint, or Mentha spicata, is a type of mint similar to peppermint. It’s a perennial plant that hails from Europe and Asia but now commonly grows on five continents around the world. It gets its name from its characteristic spear-shaped leaves. Spearmint has a pleasantly sweet taste and is frequently used to flavor toothpaste, mouthwash, chewing gum and candy.

Latin Name

Botanical Family

Europe

Native Region

Used Part

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Mentha spicata

Lamiaceae

Leaf

Research and Benefits

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