Lime

(Aurantiifolia)

Limes are sour, round, and bright green citrus fruits. They’re nutritional powerhouses — high in vitamin C, antioxidants, and other nutrients. There are many species of limes like the Key lime (Citrus aurantifolia), Persian lime (Citrus latifolia), desert lime (Citrus glauca) and kaffir lime (Citrus hystrix). Each of these species has unique characteristics. For instance, the Key lime is smaller, more acidic, and more aromatic than the more common Persian type.

Latin Name

Botanical Family

Northern India

Native Region

Used Part

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History

Most species and hybrids of citrus plants called "limes" have varying origins within tropical Southeast Asia and South Asia. They were spread throughout the world via migration and trade. The kaffir lime, in particular, was one of the earliest citrus fruits introduced to other parts of the world by humans. They were spread into Micronesia and Polynesia via the Austronesian expansion (c. 3000–1500 BCE), as well as into India, Persia, and the Mediterranean region via the spice trade and the incense trade routes from as early as ~1200 BCE.

To prevent scurvy during the 19th century, British sailors were issued a daily allowance of citrus, such as lemon, and later switched to lime. The use of citrus was initially a closely guarded military secret, as scurvy was a common scourge of various national navies, and the ability to remain at sea for lengthy periods without contracting the disorder was a huge benefit for the military. British sailors thus acquired the nickname "Limey" because of their use of limes. ​Source

Aurantiifolia

Rutaceae

Aurantiifolia

Research and Benefits

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